Industrial Technology Courses
Courses by Course Numbers - click title to see course description and prerequisites 
 
Course # 3991 – Woodworking (9)
This semester course is designed to give the student experience and confidence in the area of beginning woodworking. Power machine operation and safety are stressed throughout the course. Students will learn how to read and complete working drawings, plans of procedure and bills of materials. Students construct various projects with the use of hand tools and wood working machines. Throughout the course career possibilities will be discussed.
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Course # 3992 – Metals (9)
This semester course is designed for 9th grade students who are interested in obtaining basic knowledge about both hot and cold metals. During this course, students will study safety procedures, metal classification, hand and power tools, fasteners, sheet metal, hot metal and other areas associated with metals. A variety of projects will be constructed in both hot and cold metal.
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Course # 3993 – Design, Architecture & Engineering (9)
Use architectural principles to design and build a model house, use engineering principles to design and build structural projects. This is a hands-on course in the application of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) principles. Engineering principles will be applied while students are using a problem-solving model both individually and in groups to find solutions to various technical problems. Safety and use of tools, machines and materials will be covered as needed in finding solutions and developing projects.
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table saw Course # 3000 – Cabinetmaking I (10-12)

Cabinetmaking I is for anyone interested in the fundamentals of machinery, hand tools, and joinery used in constructing furniture and cabinets. The student will be required to construct a project using a set of plans that include drawings, a bill of materials, and a procedure list. Units covered will include woodworking basics, finishing procedures, hardware, and special emphasis on safe and proper use of tools and machinery. Successful completion of this class with a minimum of "C" grade is a prerequisite for Cabinetmaking II.
Successful completion of this class with a minimum “B” grade is prerequisite for Carpentry II class.
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Course # 3001 – Cabinetmaking I for Girls (10-12)
Cabinetmaking I for Girls is for young women who are interested in the fundamentals of machinery, hand tools, and joinery used in constructing furniture and cabinets. The student will be required to construct a project using a set of plans that include drawings, a bill of materials, and a procedure list. Units covered will include woodworking basics, finishing procedures, hardware, and special emphasis on safe and proper use of tools and machinery. Successful completion of this class with a minimum of "C" grade is a prerequisite for Cabinetmaking II.
Successful completion of this class with a minimum “B” grade is prerequisite for Carpentry II class.
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Course # 3010 – Cabinetmaking II (10-12)
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Cabinetmaking I (minimum “C” average) or instructor approval. It is also strongly recommended that students take Introduction to Drafting before taking this class.
Cabinetmaking II is for students who desire greater understanding and competence in woodworking. Students will learn basic cabinet design and construction methods. All students will design, draw, and build a custom cabinet.
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Course # 3020 – Cabinetmaking III (10-12)
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Cabinetmaking II (minimum “C” average) or instructor approval.
Cabinetmaking III is for students interested in woodworking and who want to learn advanced techniques along with the application of skills acquired in prerequisite courses. The student will be expected to develop an original project, draw a detailed set of plans, and construct it.
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Course # 3015 – Carpentry I (10-12)
Carpentry is for anyone interested in the fundamentals of home construction. The student will be required to construct a scale home using a set of plans that include plot plan, foundation plan, and floor plans. Units covered will include building materials, leveling instruments, plans, specifications and codes, footings and foundations, floor framing, wall and ceiling framing, roof framing, stair construction and carpentry – A Career Path. Successful completion of this class with a minimum “B” grade is a prerequisite for Carpentry ll class.
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Course # 3025 – Carpentry IIA (11-12) (2 class periods)house building
Course # 3026 – Carpentry IIB (11-12) (2 class periods)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Carpentry I and Cabinetmaking I with B or higher or instructor approval.
Students in this class will participate in the construction of a 1350 square foot, 3 bedroom home. The home will be constructed at the high school, then sold and moved. Students will receive detailed instruction in modern construction practices in areas such as concrete, framing, drywall, finishing roofing, plumbing and HVAC systems. Students will have the means to apply and develop these skills while constructing this house. Student achievement and work ethic in the prerequisite courses will be the criteria for selecting students to participate in this course. This course runs for two consecutive terms. Students must register for both Carpentry II A and II B.
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Course # 3150 - Introduction to Metals Technology (10-12)
Ranger U Introduction to Metals Tech introduces students to basic concepts of machine shop, welding and other hot metal processes. In machine shop, students will learn concepts, terms and basic information. Students will use machine tools, lathes, mills, drill presses and band saws. Students will also learn the more common types of welding. Forging will be explored, along with other hot metal processes. Students will use their skills to complete required and individual projects. Lab time will be utilized to develop the students’ skill, while emphasizing safe work habits. Successful completion of this course may enable students to earn 2 semester credits through Pine Technical and Community College (GSTP 1225). 
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Course # 3155 - Metal Fabrication (11-12)
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Introduction to Metals Technology, and Welding & Machine Tool Technology with a final grade of “C” or instructor approval.
Metal Fabrication will utilize students previously learned skills to complete more complicated machine and welding projects. Metal Fabrication will apply skills developed in other metal classes. The student will be required to design and fabricate an advanced project using all facets of the metal shop. These would include, but are not limited to, welding, machining, and forging. Students will be evaluated on project complexity, quality, work ethic and time management.
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Course # 3162 - Welding & Machine Tool Technology (10-12)
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Introduction to Metals Technology with a final grade of “C” or instructor approval. (It is strongly recommended that students complete Introduction to Drafting and Design prior to taking this course.)
Ranger U Welding and Machine tool technology introduces students to more advanced Machine Tool, MIG, Arc and Oxy welding concepts. Students will build on the basic skills and knowledge of Introduction to Metals Technology. Major emphasis is placed on work holding devices, location principles, inspection, tooling and cutting tools. Students will use their skills to complete required and individual projects. Lab time will be utilized to develop the students’ skill, while emphasizing safe work habits. Successful completion of this course may enable students to earn 4 semester credits through Pine Technical and Community College (MTTP 1245). 
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Course # 3300 – Electricity/Electronics I (10-12)electronics
Learn how to create electrical circuits where lights blink, buzzers blast, sirens ring, lights come on in the dark, burglar alarms set off, and amplification takes place. During all these activities, the student will learn about electrical components, how they operate, what an electrical circuit is and how to draw electrical diagrams called schematics. Students will handle all the parts, build the circuits on their own circuit boards and flip the switch that makes it all happen.
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Course # 3310 - Electricity/Electronics II (10-12)
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Electricity/Electronics I with C or higher or instructor approval.
Time to get digital and learn troubleshooting and repair! Students will build an AM radio and learn how sound waves are produced, transmitted, amplified and received. They will also learn troubleshooting procedures while testing their radios by using oscilloscopes, frequency generators and digital multi-meters. Using prototyping circuit boards, students will build and test numerous circuits using various digital components and integrated circuits.
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Course # 3500 - Power Mechanics I (10-12)
Power Mechanics I covers the basic discussion of all types of internal combustion engines, with emphasis on four-cycle engines. Students will have access to a four-cycle small engine for lab work. Laboratory time will be devoted to disassembly examination, reconditioning, and assembly of small gas engines. As time permits, additional engines will be repaired and other areas in power mechanics will also be explored. This course is a prerequisite to Power Mechanics II and also to Auto Technology A & B.
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Course # 3510 - Power Mechanics II (10-12)
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Power Mechanics I (minimum “C” average) or instructor approval
Power Mechanics II is offered to students who have successfully completed the Power Mechanics I course with a C or higher. This course is designed to give the student additional skills and theory in the maintenance, repair and overhaul of two and four-cycle engines. In-depth units in ignition, carburetion, electrical and tune up will be covered. The course will also cover drive train, suspension systems, steering mechanisms and chassis repair as applicable to snowmobiles, motorcycles, outboards and ATV’s. Students enrolling in this course are required to supply their own projects to complete the course and receive a passing grade.
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Course # 3520 – Consumer Automotive (11-12)

Consumer Automotive is intended as an introductory course that will give car owners and operators a basic understanding of automobiles and how to maintain them. Students will learn about the basic systems found in automobiles. They will focus on a variety of topics including safety, tools, and basic maintenance including oil and tire changes, fluid maintenance, and general electrical service. Basic troubleshooting and problem solving will also be included. This course cannot be taken in place of Power Mechanics 1 to meet the prerequisite to Automotive Technology. If students have already taken or are currently registered for Auto Technology, they will not be admitted into Consumer Automotive. Students are required to have access to a vehicle and have a valid MN driver’s license to be admitted into Consumer Automotive.
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automotive technology Course # 3521 - Auto Technology A (11-12) (2 class periods)
Course # 3522 - Auto Technology B (11-12) (2 class periods)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Power Mechanics I with a C or higher or instructor approval
This course includes instruction in the following areas: Engine theory and diagnosis, tune-up, fuel supply systems, electrical systems, brakes, wheel alignment and tire service. At the conclusion of this course students will have a marketable skill in the areas they have covered. This course will meet for TWO CONSECUTIVE CLASS PERIODS. Students must register for both Auto Technology A and B. Students will earn one credit for each term. Students must maintain a “C” average in the first term in order to continue on to the second term. Only two terms of auto technology may be taken. *College credit possible. See “Articulated Courses” section on page 14 of registration guide for more information.
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Course # 3710 - Architecture I (10-12)

This is an introductory course to the field of architecture and architectural drawing. Students will be focusing on the principles of residential design, and draw floor plans of their designs. Students will also explore basic residential construction methods and their impact on home design. Computer aided drafting (CAD) will be a part of this course. Successful completion of this course is a prerequisite to Architecture 2.
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Course # 3720 - Architecture II (10-12)house design

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Architecture I
Students will complete original home plans in their continuing education of home design and architetural drawing. Plans will include floor, foundation, elevations and section views. Participants will further their knowledge of residential construction, the products used, and their impact on design. Computer aided drafting (CAD) will be a part of the course. Successful completion of this course is a prerequisite to Architecture III.
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Course # 3730 – Architecture III (10-12)
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Architecture 2
In this course, the student will have the opportunity to design a lake home for a fictional client and use foam board to build a simple architectural model of it. Other activities will include designing a kitchen and laying out the cabinets, lay their home design out on a plot plan, and view their design by drawing a 2 point perspective view. HVAC, plumbing, and waste systems will be explored. Again, computer aided drafting (CAD) will be a part of the class work.
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computer drafted car Course # 3700 - Introduction to Computer Aided Drafting (10-12)
This class exposes students to the basics of drafting and design using modern computer aided drafting (CAD) programs. Students will learn to illustrate objects from a variety of views as used in engineering and industry. Manual drafting, 2D CAD and 3D Solid modeling will all be part of this course, as well as 3D printing. This class is highly recommended for anyone interested in a variety of occupations including (but not limited to) engineering,design, machining, construction, or mechanics. Successful completion of this class is a prerequisite for the remaining engineering and drafting courses, and recommended before taking Cabinetmaking II, and Metal Fabrication.
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Course # 3800 - Engineering & Drafting I (10-12)
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Introduction to Computer Aided Drafting3D Printing
Ranger U Students will learn about engineering and design by drawing in both 2D and 3D drawing software. During the course the student will begin to focus on 3D solid modeling using "Solidworks" software. This type of software is used by modern engineers and manufacturers for design. Students will also be able to convert 3D drawings into a 3D PRINT!
Successful completion of this course may enable students to earn 3 semester credits through Pine Technical and Community College (MTTP 1241). 
Successful completion of this course is a prerequisite for “Engineer Drafting ll”
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Course # 3810 - Engineering & Drafting II (10-12)
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Engineering & Drafting I
Students in this course will design and engineer their own projects using 3D design software and be able to use a 3D printer. The course focuses entirely on design using 3 dimensional solid modeling software called "Solidworks". 3D solid modeling is the modern industry standard for design. Every student successfully completing the course will receive a free copy of 3D modeling software. The class will also include a field trip to see 3D designing, testing, and machining being used in industry.
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